Bradford

 

Bradford

Is a small city located in rural McKean County, Pennsylvania, in the United States 78 miles (126 km) south of Buffalo, New York. Settled in 1823, Bradford was chartered as a city in 1879 and emerged as a wild oil boomtown in the Pennsylvanian oil rush in the late 19th century. The area’s Pennsylvania Grade crude oil has superior qualities and is free of asphaltic constituents, contains only trace amounts of sulfur and nitrogen, and has excellent characteristics for refining into lubricants. World-famous Kendall racing oils were produced in Bradford.

The population peaked at 17,691 in 1940, but as of the 2000 census had dropped to 9,175 and was still declining at mid-decade according to census bureau estimates. Two adjoining townships, home to approximately 9,000 people, make the population of Greater Bradford about 18,000. Famous Bradfordians include opera singer Marilyn Horne and Hall of Fame baseball player Rube Waddell. A famous Perpetual Motion machine hoax was created in Bradford in 1897 by J M Aldrich; it was exposed in the July 1, 1899 issue of the Scientific American magazine, leading to a four month prison sentence in the county jail.

Geography

Bradford is located at 41°57′33″N 78°38′41″W / 41.95917°N 78.64472°W / 41.95917; -78.64472 (41.959100, -78.644611)[3]. It is located on Route 219 just south of its junction with I-86 above the New York State border.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.5 square miles (8.9 km²).3.5 square miles (8.9 km²) of it is land, and none of the area is covered with water. Bradford is situated in a valley in the Allegheny Mountains and is surrounded by woods and steep hills. Two branches of the Tunungwant Creek enter the city, merge and flow north into the Allegheny River just across the New York border.

Bradford Regional Airport is located about 15 miles (24 km) south of the city, at Mount Alton. Because of its elevation, the airport often has the coldest reported air temperatures in Pennsylvania and occasionally the coldest in the nation. The airport has one of the few National Weather Service stations across the entire northern tier of the state. Temperatures in the city are typically three to seven degrees warmer than at the airport, and city temperatures are representative of other communities in northern Pennsylvania and southwestern New York.

Source: Wikipedia

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Blogplay
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Translator
Pages